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Data Centre Services In India

This report explains the role of Data Centre in the developing countries like India in various fields.

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Definition / Scope

  1. There are many possible definitions for a “Data Centre”. Some of them are:
    1. “Data centre services encompass all of the technology and facility-related components or activities that support the projects and operation of a data centre, which is an environment that provides processing, storage, networking, management and the distribution of data within an enterprise.”
    2. “Data Centre services is a collective term for the supporting components necessary for the proper operation of a repository for storage, management and dissemination of data organized around a body of knowledge or pertaining to an enterprise. As such, data Centre services can involve hardware, software, processes and personnel.”
    3. “Data Centre services is a collective term for the supporting components necessary for the proper operation of a repository for storage, management and dissemination of data organized around a body of knowledge or pertaining to an enterprise.”
  2. If you noticed, all the given definitions are basically focusing on following things:
    1. Processing of data,
    2. Storage of data,
    3. Management of data,
    4. Dissemination of data, and
    5. Using the latest technology (hardware and software) to create efficient data Centre.
  1. This report basically brings out the facts, figures and data about the past, present and future of the “Data Centre Services” in India.
  2. This research report is based on various secondary research projects, sample surveys and reports by numerous organization. This report also consists about the future technology which can be implemented in “Data Centre” for better efficiency and tells about the “Data Centre” in detail with ease.

What is it made up of? 

  1. A “Data Centre” consists of the following:
    1. Hardware,
    2. Managed power distribution,
    3. Backup power systems (Inverters or Generators),
    4. Data Backup, and/or archiving,
    5. Managed load balancing (just in case storage reaches its threshold),
    6. Controlled internet access (too much access to internet can lead to malfunctioning due to virus intrusion),
    7. Managed e-mail and messaging
    8. Managed user authentication and authorization (most important part of all),
    9. Diverse firewalls and their anti-malware programs (no doubt data Centres need this),
    10. Managed outsourcing,
    11. Managed business continuance (of-course, that’s why companies have data Centres), and
    12. Continuous and efficient technical support.
  2. Now, that we have seen the building blocks of “Data Centres”, let us have a look at the human labor which is required to build up “Data Centre”, after all, even the building blocks need to be built first.
    1. The Facilities Manager- This individual is equipped with knowledge in all mechanical devices within the Data Centre infrastructure, from air handlers and power distribution units to fire sprinklers and standby generators.
    2. The IT Manager- This person is responsible for the servers installed in the Data Centre.
    3. The Network Engineer- This person designs, supports and manages the Data Centre’s network.
    4. The Data Centre Manager- This individual designs, supports and manages the Data Centre’s physical architecture (infrastructure) and oversees the layout and installation of further incoming servers with the existing ones.
    5. The Real Estate Manager- This person is responsible for the optimal use of space provided for the Data Centre.
    6. The Project Manager- This person is the heart of this project. Everything is managed by him. He’s the manager of the managers. He is responsible for the Data Centre project as a whole, including its budget, timelines and supervision of outside contractors.
    7. The Architectural Firm- He’s the one person without whose N.O.C. (No Objection Certificate) for a plan whose design needs compile with the building codes, the plan can come at a still.
    8. The General Contractor- This person is the one you need to contact if you want to contact other contractors.
    9. The Electrical Contractor- This person is the “electrician” of the Data Centre. He’s responsible for installation, labelling and testing of all the Centre’s electrical and standby equipment.
    10. The Mechanical Contractor- This person is Data Centre’s “A.C. Man”. He’s responsible for installation and testing of all Centre’s cooling equipment. Ducting is typically the contractor’s responsibility as well.
    11. The Cabling Contractor- This individual installs and tests all of the Data Centre’s structured cabling. Its staff also installs any racks or cabinets that cabling terminates into, and labels the room’s cable runs.
  3. Now that we are ready with are “Playing XI”, let’s move ahead.

Where to place our “Data Centre”?

  1. A lot of factors need to be considered for the construction of a “Data Centre”, like
    1. Earthquakes- Even minor earthquakes can result in loss of important data due to malfunctioning of servers or disconnection of cables.
    2. Floods- Water and servers are by birth enemies of each other. Data Centres should be placed high up from the grounds so that in case of floods, water is not able to touch any part of the Centre, else, even a single damaged wire can corrupt the Centre.
    3. Lightning- 220V of electricity is sent from the transformers of the electricity plants which runs the “Data Centres” efficiently. But if, nature provides that electricity, I am sure it would give 2,200V of electricity free of cost resulting in our “Data Centre” to become worthless. “Data Centres” should be placed in electricity-tamper proof rooms.
    4. Fires- Water sprinklers, Emergency shout-down and backup should be ready to apply any time as “Data Centres” require lots of electricity, hence huge risk of fire is present 24*7.
    5. Climate- Too harsh weather is too much for “Data Centres”. Hot weather can result into malfunctioning of air coolers, cold weather can result into freezing of servers. Hence, a place with optimal weather should be chosen.

Constructing an “Almost ideal” Data Centre

  1. In science, we learn that ideal results are never possible to achieve in real world conditions. Hence, we can only try to make our product tend to being “ideal”. Here are a few methods with the help of which we can make our Data Centre efficient,
    1. Making it robust
      1. It needs to be reliable. Regardless of what catastrophes happen, we expect our “Data Centre” up and running so that the business continues to operate.
      2. Infrastructure of the “Data Centre” must have depth, i.e., standby power supplies to take over when commercial electricity fails and redundant work stations to handle the communication needs of a networking device malfunctions.
      3. The infrastructure must be configured properly so that the Centre is not vulnerable. One should have multiple standby power systems, or have redundant data connections.
    2. Making it modular
      1. “Data Centre” must have sufficient power, data and cooling throughout the room so that incoming servers can be deployed according to a logical master plan, not at the mercy of wherever there happens to be enough electrical outlets or data ports to support them.
      2. Modularity keeps the Centre’s infrastructure simple and scalable. It also provides redundancy on a smaller scale. If a component fails at a time, then the user should be able to plug into another area and immediately be operational again without data loss.
    3. Making it flexible
      1. Assumptions should be kept in mind already that the ‘routers’, ‘switches’, ‘servers’ and ‘data storage chips’ will become smaller or bigger in the upcoming years.
      2. “Data Centres’” shouldn’t be made static, nor their location. Flexibility should be present.
    4. Standardize
      1. Make the environment of the Centre a consistent one.
      2. Try new designs for the Centre, they might turn out to be more efficient rather than following the same old design.
      3. Make your design a standard one. Avoid variety for variety’s sake. The more complex the environment becomes, the greater the chance that someone will misunderstand and make a mistake, that too in an emergency.
    5. Good habits! Seriously?
      1. It should be engineered in a way that it should encourage desirable behaviour.
      2. Data Centre should be have high speed troubleshooters.
    6. Data Centre Ergonomics
      1. Make things accessible
      2. Choose simple over complex
      3. Remove mystery
      4. Consider human nature

Market Overview

  1. The Indian Data Centre market is poised for a healthy growth due to demand coming from sectors such as BFSI, Telecom, IT and Social Media.
  2. The rise of several heavy-memory-requiring-applications and the exceptional demand for storage space, are some of the few factors that are leading to the exponential growth of the Data Centre segment.
  3. In today’s world, the urge to increase the storage capacity has become a kind of ‘men at work’ for every large enterprise, there is a continuous rise in the numbers of customers needy of data and applications, there is optimism around cloud and there is the blast of big data. It goes without saying that in India, the Data Centre market has every reason to be upbeat about the prospects for the 21st century’s industry.
  4. In line with the global trends, the Indian Data Centre market is in the positive sentiments in the economy and the powerful resurgence of growth-related projects across verticals such as banking, insurance, telecom and the government. According to research firm “Gartner”, Indian Data Centre infrastructure market, comprising of server, storage and networking equipment, we shall see a 5.4% increase to $2.03 billion in 2015.
  5. Cloud, Convergence, Virtualization propelling demand
    1. "The Indian data Centre market is poised for healthy growth due to demand coming from sectors such as BFSI, Telecom, IT and Social Media. Apart from these sectorial influences, various eGovernance initiatives of Centre and state governments are also fuelling the demand,” says Vinod Ganesan, Director – Platform Solutions & Services Hitachi Data Systems, India
  6. Optimizing Data Centre
    1. “As far as cloud is concerned, many of the service providers have started rolling it out. Some of them are offering cloud services to the general public, to gain more mind share with the end-consumers. Many enterprises have implemented the cloud architecture, though they have kept it as private. Making it public will take some more time as many enterprises are concerned about issues of accessibility, availability and security,” says Alamuri Sitaramaiah – MD India & SAARC CommScope
  7. Challenges: Energy, Security and Sovereignty
    1. “A primary concern for most data Centre operators in the country is to ensure business continuity with a focus on issues such as reducing energy consumption, manageability, scalability, efficiency and security in the dataCentre,” says Shrirang Deshpande of Emerson Network Power, India.
  8. Impact of “Make in India”
    1. Shibu Paul of “Array Networks” points out the any country that has moved out of their regular growth trend has invested and executed an effective manufacturing policy.
    2. Conducive regulatory framework and availability of optimal infrastructure are basic to doing business for domestic as well as multi-national companies.
  9. Future look uprising
    1. According to Gartner, the data Centre and co-location business in India is expected to touch $ 1.3 billion which is being fuelled by increased outsourcing of data Centre requirements by banks and Government
    2. “With increasing numbers of users coming online and the government’s ‘Make in India’ initiative, we believe that offering data Centre operators the agility to respond to change with innovative solutions and cost, as well as energy efficient DC infrastructure will drive the growth engine for most players in this segment in 2015,” concludes Shrirang Deshpande of Emerson Network Power, India.

Key Metrics

Metrics Value Explanation
Base Year 2017 Researched through internet


Industry Challenges

  1. The growth opportunities for Indian Data Centres are well known and well documented. However on the other side of the coin, there exist certain threats that might derail the growth progress.
  2. The data Centre market in India, is due to grow rapidly in the next 5 years. However, power security remains a significant risk stemming from the lack of diversity of energy imports and increasing reliance on thermal and oil import.
  3. Power availability and reliability is one major factor which if left unattended, will lead to disastrous result for Data Centres and its growth. The off shoots of power availability are:
    1. Increased cost of operation
    2. Difficulties in expansion of operations
    3. Increased capital cost

Other Key Market Trends

Green Data Centre

  1. A green Data Centre can be achieved by the following steps
    1. The organization should have alternative sources of power like “wind”, “solar energy”, etc.
    2. Efficient floor layout
    3. Recycling of waste material
    4. Using green rated power equipment
    5. Using weather changes for increased power efficiency

Description

Savings

Right Sizing NCPI

10%-30%

Virtualize Servers

10%-40%

Efficient Architecture and Layout

7%-15 %

Using weather changes

4%-15 %


Market Size and Forecast

  1. The third party Data Centre market in 2009 is pegged at US$ 266 million, which is expected to reach US$ 481 million by the year 2011, growing at a CAGR of 34.5%. Whereas the captive Data Centre market in India is estimated to be around US$ 1169 million and is expected to touch US$ 1681 million by 2011, growing at a CAGR of 19.9%.
  2. The third party Data Centre market in 2009 is pegged at US$ 266 million, which is expected to reach US$ 481 million by the year 2011, growing at a CAGR of 34.5%. Whereas the captive Data Centre market in India is estimated to be around US$ 1169 million and is expected to touch US$ 1681 million by 2011, growing at a CAGR of 19.9%.
  3. The third party Data Centre market in 2009 is pegged at US$ 266 million, which is expected to reach US$ 481 million by the year 2011, growing at a CAGR of 34.5%. Whereas the captive Data Centre market in India is estimated to be around US$ 1169 million and is expected to touch US$ 1681 million by 2011, growing at a CAGR of 19.9%.

Year

Sq. ft.

2009

2,148,064

2010

3,086,732

2011

4,253,488

2012

5,644,521

2013

7,251,678

2014

8,877,893

Source: IDC- Analyzing Future, Project Report on “Data Centres”

Data transfer based pa

Price range (US $)

10 GB

750 to 850

20 GB

1,500 to 1,600

50 GB

2,700 to 2,900

  1. Pricing of Hosting
    1. Pricing basically depends upon the type of hosting of servers
      1. Dedicated
      2. Shared
    2. Dedicated hosting is majorly charged on
      1. Servers (nos. and types, complete server or rented)
      2. Bandwidth
      3. HDD
    3. Shared hosting is charged on
      1. Disk space
      2. Bandwidth

Present Situation of Data Centre Market in India

  1. Market size: $983 million

Telecom Services Carriers

55

Service Management outsourcing

30

Corporate Banking and Global Business

15

Source: CtrlS- Emerging Data Centre Trends

Public Sectors

20

Foreign Hosting Companies

22

Telecom

26

DR and Business Continuity

22

Global Information Management

10

Source: CtrlS- Emerging Data Centre Trends

References

  1. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_Centre_services
  2. http://searchdataCentre.techtarget.com/definition/data-Centre-services
  3. http://www.hcltech.com/it-infrastructure-management/data-Centre-services
  4. http://www.wipro.com/services/infrastructure-services/services/data-Centre-services/
  5. http://ww2.colt.net/dk/en/products-services/data-centre-services/index.htm
  6. http://www.slideshare.net/DeepanshuGahlaut92/how-to-build-a-green-data-Centre?qid=0642da25-6daa-4745-9c3a-a3f6a1d302be&v=default&b=&from_search=2
  7. http://www.slideshare.net/Panduit/panduit-dcim-solution-overview?qid=0642da25-6daa-4745-9c3a-a3f6a1d302be&v=default&b=&from_search=8
  8. http://www.slideshare.net/HPenterprise/hp-embrace-the-new-era-of-data-Centre-and-cloud-services?qid=0642da25-6daa-4745-9c3a-a3f6a1d302be&v=qf1&b=&from_search=19
  9. http://www.slideshare.net/Jeroeen/data-Centre-4363269?qid=0642da25-6daa-4745-9c3a-a3f6a1d302be&v=qf1&b=&from_search=23
  10. http://www.slideshare.net/SunilGupta1/data-Centre-opportunities-in-india-2009-final-v13?qid=0ba6ecd1-a9a3-496b-9cf5-26b66dd2dcc1&v=qf1&b=&from_search=1
  11. http://www.slideshare.net/SunilGupta1/data-Centre-opportunities-in-india-2009-final-v13?qid=0ba6ecd1-a9a3-496b-9cf5-26b66dd2dcc1&v=qf1&b=&from_search=1
  12. http://computer.financialexpress.com/magazine/data-Centre-industry-poised-for-rapid-growth/10189/
  13. http://www.ctrl4c.com/images/CtrlS-Emerging-data-Centre-trends.pdf
  14. https://dataCentres.lbl.gov/sites/all/files/CII%20Energy%20Efficieny%20in%20Indian%20Data%20Centres-%20Present%20Trends%20and%20Future%20Opportunities.pdf


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